Author Topic: THE ROAD AND WILDLIFE?  (Read 2076 times)

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Offline K9

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THE ROAD AND WILDLIFE?
« on: October 20, 2007, 07:14:02 PM »
Today on the way home from work I came across a very badly injured deer ,a large young Roe deer I think .He was lying on the grass verge looking around  but not the place to take a rest , so I went back and checked and sadly he had 3 shattered legs, THEN WHAT DO I DO? Do I call 999  ??I rang Justine to try and get a number or 2 and my daughter who came back with wildlife rescues who didnt answer the phone or I couldnt call as my phone wouldnt allow it  so as Justine said its says on RSPCA to call police, but is that 999? Well I did and they were ok ,passed me over a couple of times until got to someone who then said they would inform RSPCA , rang me back to say RSPCA would contact me ,which they did .couldnt send anyone till  the person who had the licence to kill came on dutyat 9 , turned up at 10 as he had to come from London way . He was a  decent ,nice chap and shot the deer  without stressing the poor thing,  a nice lady brought me a flask of coffee and stayed with me throughout, I reported the deer at 8.30 and it was destroyed at 10 .A long time for the deer and for me ,

What makes me angry is the bastard who hit it some time last night/or early hours and didnt report it ,stop and get help and left it to drag itself along the grass verge with its legs in peices ,What I wish on him is unprintable apart from the fact that I hope its slow and painful :(

Why is there no emergency number to ring for injured animals like there is 999 for us humans.
 Rest in peace beautiful deer :'(
Chris
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alfiesmummy

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Re: THE ROAD AND WILDLIFE?
« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2007, 12:13:26 AM »
I received a call this morning at about 08.10 from Chris,K9 asking me to get some numbers for her about the deer on the side of the road. May I just mention that Chris had just worked a nightshift! I went on line and couldnt get any responce from the numbers that were available, I called 2 vets...... still no help with the numbers that they gave me!!! Eventually I found a wild life site that told me to contact the police. I gave Chris this information and much to her distress, the deer was put to sleep.

PLEASE KEEP EMERGENCY NUMBERS STORED IN YOUR MOBILES!

Chris you did all that you could for this deer.

alfiesmummy

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Re: THE ROAD AND WILDLIFE?
« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2007, 12:59:55 AM »
HELP AND ADVICE IF YOU COME ACCROSS AN INJURED WILD ANIMAL OR BIRD.
What to do if you find an injured or orphaned animal 
Stop! Do NOT attempt to handle a live badger, deer or fox. They can all inflict severe injuries to humans. You can protect these larger mammals from receiving further injury by positioning a car with its hazard warning lights and headlights on, behind the creature, to warn other road users, providing it does not endanger you or other road users.

Do move any dead creatures off the highway as they can attract other birds and animals to them as they scavenge which then places these other wildlife, and road users, at further risk. To check if a creature is dead, a gentle prod with a long stick should be enough to provoke some response from an animal if it is still alive.

In the boot of your car it can be handy to carry a strong cardboard box (or pet carrier), a torch, a towel and a pair of thick gardening gauntlets.

Covering an injured animal will help reduce stress and keep it warm, but do not over handle the animal or bird. Put it somewhere quiet, dark and warm. Wild creatures are not calmed by contact with humans. Talking to them and stroking them can only increase their stress.

Do keep the number of your nearest wildlife rescue centre to hand. We suggest keeping one copy near the phone and one copy in your car.

Do keep all birds away from your face. Long beaked and long necked birds (herons and grebes in particular) will peck at anything shiny, your eyes being an obvious target.

Do watch out for the talons on birds of prey (owls, kestrels, sparrow hawks, etc.) as these are their most dangerous weapon. Throw a towel over the bird and pick it up using thick gloves.

A basic rule of thumb - if you can pick up any wildlife it probably needs help.
The most important exception to this rule is baby deer (fawns). The adult deer will leave them hidden in undergrowth for anything up to eight hours at a time. If the fawns have human scent on them the adult may well abandon them. If you are in any doubt contact your local wildlife centre who will ensure that the fawn is discreetly monitored until the mother deer returns.

Also fox cubs can be moved by a vixen and left for a while. Give the vixen a chance to return to pick it up. The more noise the cub makes the more chance of the vixen hearing it and retrieving it.

Baby birds can often be placed back in a nest (using gloved hands) if it can be located. Monitor from a distance to see that the parent birds return to the nest. Baby birds are fed pretty constantly throughout daylight hours, so if a parent bird does not return within an hour or so, contact your local rescue centre for help.

 
« Last Edit: October 22, 2007, 01:05:00 AM by alfiesmummy »

alfiesmummy

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Re: THE ROAD AND WILDLIFE?
« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2007, 01:04:37 AM »
IF YOU SEE AN INJURED DEER IN THE ROAD..... CALL THE POLICE!

The Facts
Most deer crossing accidents occur between October and December.

Highest-risk periods are from sunset to midnight and at sunrise.

Motorists should dim their headlights when a deer is noted - it may be startled and freeze in the road.

Don't swerve - if a collision seems inevitable, hit the deer and maintain control of the vehicle.


Try to come to a stop as far in front of the deer as possible so it can leave the roadside without panic.

Slow down for wildlife, take note of warning signs, and report all collisions to the police.

 
« Last Edit: October 22, 2007, 01:06:09 AM by alfiesmummy »

Offline paul the vegan dog lover

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Re: THE ROAD AND WILDLIFE?
« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2007, 02:29:02 AM »
That looks like good advice to me. In the past I have tended to call the police straightaway, but I will now see if I can find the numbers of other more qualified professionals, wildlife agencies and so forth, and if possible post them here.
Paul Russell


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generally the one who is willing to do and dare."  Dale Carnegie 1888-1955,
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Offline K9

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Re: THE ROAD AND WILDLIFE?
« Reply #5 on: October 29, 2007, 10:45:31 AM »
FOLLY RESCUE 01892 750337 Kent
He is your friend,your partner, your defender,Your Dog! You are his life,his love,his leader! He will be yours,faithful and true to the last beat of his heart! You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion!
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Offline K9

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Re: THE ROAD AND WILDLIFE?
« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2010, 05:22:06 AM »
Folly is a UK charity dedicated to the rescue & rehabilitation of wildlife. (Registered Charity: 1091857)

HELPLINE: If you have a wildlife casualty or need advice please phone: 07957 949 825

The HELPLINE is open 7 days a week from 8am to 9pm.
He is your friend,your partner, your defender,Your Dog! You are his life,his love,his leader! He will be yours,faithful and true to the last beat of his heart! You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion!
SAVING ONE DOG MAY NOT CHANGE THE WORLD BUT IT SURE WILL CHANGE THE WORLD FOR THAT ONE DOG